Where Mowsette reblogs stuff (mostly others art, art reference type things, and the occasional funny I want to share with my friends) and may or may not make the occasional useless post. I'll also reblog things with same-sex couples, seeing as I find that all love is beautiful, so if that offends you, you may not want to be here.

Anyway, this blog is probably not important at all to be honest, not even worth following, what are you even doing here? :o
My main/art blog is this way!!

gobi-baptiste-gaubert:

Some pages, sketches and illustration of Goligo.
Still working on the second issue.

lulusketches:

environment drawing challenge #9: jungle. challenging myself to be more versatile in style! going to experiment a ton for the rest of these environments :)

source: lulusketches

sheythereyall sent: Hi Tom!! I'm a digital animation student and I was wondering if you have any tips for getting a job at Disney. That's kind of one of my lifetime goals. I would absolutely love to hear back from you! --Shey

tombancroft1:

Hey Shey.  Sorry for this late reply, I just saw I had messages.  I get this question a lot.  ”Do you have a TIP on how I get into Disney as an animator/character designer/concept artist- its my dream”.  

I’m answering you, but posting this for all to see.  

(NOTE: Shey, ignore any snarky-ness in my tone, you don’t deserve it and seem like a very nice person.  This is a global answer since I’m posting it and not necessarily directed toward you.   I just get this question A LOT and, hopefully unlike yourself, by people that just want to dream it; not work for it.)  

First of all, when you ask someone that question, you really should have your portfolio in your hand and have JUST SHOWN that person it.  Without that, I truly am just giving you the most general of answers.  That said, you just want a “tip” on how to do it?  The easy answer is to Google search it and most likely you’ll end up at Disney animation’s website where I assume (I’ve never looked) they probably have some instructions on how to submit your portfolio online and (hopefully) an idea of what they want you to have in it.  That’s a tip.  

But here’s the honest answer and its a bit more than a tip.  The real question you should be asking is, “What do i need to do to make it as a professional artist at one of the biggest/oldest/ most respected/ competitive animation studios in the world?”  I’ll be even more direct: by not even knowing what you are REALLY asking, it tells me you’re not ready.  The person asking how to become what took me 25 years and looking for a “tip” for an answer has a long way to go to understand the competitive effort and strong work ethic needed to make it at a major animation studio, much less get that first entry level job as an artist.  First, take an honest look at your work and compare it to PROs.  Not your peers.  Not your Deviant Art followers, your parents, siblings, or high school friends- but compare it to the people’s work who’s JOB you want to take away.  Sounds tough, right?  At many studios, that’s what it comes down to: Someone has to leave for a job to be open, so there’s some truth to it.  But that mentality of  looking at your ARTISTIC HEROES as your competition will give you a good sense to what you are up against.  The best of the best.  Yes, there are entry-level positions at most of the studios, but you don’t want that.  You want to jump past that and be an animator, character designer, concept artist.  Not a storyboard revisionist.  Not an intern.  Maybe you’ll take those positions to get your foot in the door?  Good, because that’s all you’re gonna get offered to you.  Even if you draw like the teen version of Glen Keane (if you don’t know who he is then you’re also showing how “not ready” you are) you still don’t have that precious commodity that producers put equal weight on: Experience.   So, buckle down remember you’re young still (unlike me) and do the work needed and expect an entry level position for all that hard work.  It’s fact.  How long you stay in that entry level position is where you’re ability will pay off though.  Some climb high and fast.  Others, their whole career is a struggle.  Hard work can make a difference, but I believe there is a mysterious “A” gene that is a bit bigger in some people’s DNA than most.  And that “A” stands for “Ability”.  

I can shorten it to a TIP though: DRAW EVERY DAY.  

I know I sound like a crodgity-old man (and part of me is) but know that I am answering this question not for you, but for ALL the people that have asked it.  BUT- even more importantly- know that I’m ALSO not answering this just for me but for all the other artist pros that have been asked it.  Listen to these words:  Wake up.  Quite dreaming and start WORKING.

You’ll have my job in no time. :) 

wannabeanimator:

Art Business Bootcamp 2: Getting You Hired
high resolution →

wannabeanimator:

Art Business Bootcamp 2: Getting You Hired

typette:

sketchinfun:

jamwoods:

So, I guess this is some of the stuff I worked on at Disney last summer 2013.
Thanks for having me:)!

Y’all go follow James ya hear! :) He’s awesomely talented! He was one of the Disney vis dev interns last summer.

what a neat training exercise :B

naekolehasposts sent: Dear Endling, I've been a huge fan since I saw your comics on Snafu. I'm struggling, and have been for awhile. Art is my passion, but I don't have the right education to pursue a career in it. I've been unable to find my style, and have been stuck for a year. Do you have any advice on where I can read/study to improve my skills to eventually, find my own style?

endling:

  This is a question I’ve been asked a lot, but to be honest it never really gets that much easier to answer. Every artist being an individual, it’s tough to find catch-alls that work for everyone, you know what I  mean? And hell, truth be told, I’m still trying to figure this stuff out for myself. :]

  Let me get this first bit out of the way, the bit nobody wants to hear: “Practice, practice, practice.” It’s the biggest, stinkiest old chestnut in the book, the one you’ve probably heard a million times before, but unfortunately, it is the most rock solid, time-tested advice any artist can swear by. Even when you feel down and out, even when things don’t look like they should. You keep on drawing, because art has a funny way of growing with you, even if you’re not aware of it. 

 But try different things. Some personal suggestions:

- Draw from life. Do figure studies. Your art will only go as far as the strong foundation you’ve built on. It can be arduous, but it is worth it. There is no way around this, much as many folks find this the token ‘boring’ advice.

- Look up light and color theory online. Nowadays there is a ridiculous amount of information on this subject on the internet. You could probably cobble together a near full education on the subject just from all the different people who have guides, examples, even youtube videos on the matter. It’s really amazing. There are tons of people out there trying to help young artists get on their feet, and they aren’t charging a thin dime. Take advantage of it. :]

- Warm up before you draw! Draw scribbles, cubes, shapes with some zing to them. Drawing can be a workout! So like any workout, warm up! Don’t dive right in and injure yourself. :] It’s a good way to stave off feeling discouraged because things  didn’t turn out looking brilliant right off the bat. 

- Try emulating a variety of other artists’ work. (With their consent if you’re posting it somewhere of course.) Sometimes when drawing in someone else’s style your own little mannerisms and stylistic influences tend to pop up in the result. This is more a fun exercise though, certainly not something to fall back on as a means to improve. You don’t want to end up relying on the same artistic ‘shortcuts’ your chosen artists employ in their own work without a firm understanding of the basics yourself.

- Draw quickly, loosely, even carelessly. Less thought, more winging it. Fly by the seat of them pants. Have fun letting go! At least, for a practice run at first. While ‘style’ is at best a nebulous concept, I’ve always found that if you draw speedily, you tend to put emphasis in certain areas, sort of feel your hand moving a particular way? If you don’t let too much thought get in the way, you can sometimes see the raw tendencies you have underneath the art. 

- Animation! Regarding stuff to read to improve your skills, there is no shortage of books available in places like Barnes & Noble. Entire sections on art. I recommend, personally, books on animation techniques. I was originally an animation major in college, and I think any artist can benefit greatly by studying it thoroughly. 

- Draw for yourself, not for the internet. This is a more fairly recent issue I’ve been seeing with some people, but there are folks out there who get a little too attached to the reception (or lack thereof) they receive for posting their work online, or worse still, seem to only draw with the specific intent of putting things online. While it’s all well and good to share your work with other people, please please please do not forget that you are drawing for yourself. You don’t have to post everything you make. Allow yourself plenty of time to make plenty of terrible drawings. Fall flat on your face. You can share the stuff you’d like, but you don’t have to feel compelled to share everything you do.

- Art blocks and burn out will happen. Don’t sweat ‘being stuck’ so much. Don’t rush getting OUT of it either. Art blocks are kind of a way of telling you you’re running on empty in one way or another. I’ve gotten asked quite often what I do to get over an art block. The answer is really simple: wait. Haha. But you find things to do that get you feeling charged up again. I like listening to music and playing games. Games are what got me into art in the first place, so it’s kind of a back-and-forth process for me. But what I’m trying to say here is, art and your life are pretty much connected in every way. If your art just doesn’t want to come out easily on the page, maybe you should find something else to do that you enjoy. Refill, recharge, re-energize, but NOT just to get over an art block. Your daily life might be more attached to your work than you realize. Which brings me to my next point..

- Don’t look so hard for ‘your style’. You need to grow as much as your artwork. As I said before, style is kind of a strange subject. To most people style is simply ‘how your art looks’, what sets it apart from other folks. But if you ask me, style is whatever ignites your passion to create in the first place. Style can be influenced by other art, sure, but it can also be influenced by music, games, sports, books, your background, the things you enjoy, just the person you are from the ground up. Style comes from pouring yourself into your work. And you know what? You need to grow just as much as your artwork. If you put a piece of yourself into your art, it will undoubtedly be unique, because you’re a unique person yourself. Find something you want to say and let it come out through your art.

And yes, that’s about the floweriest answer I’ve ever given on the subject of style. I guess when it comes to the subject of art I can be a sappy sap. But DAMMIT I BELIEVE IN YOU. And anyone else reading this that might have been feeling the same way! And I really appreciate the question! Hell, I’m honored, and hope in any way at all I can help, because art is a beautiful thing to have in your life, and I wish you the absolute best of luck with it. 

Now DRAW. DRAAAAAAAAAW, I SAY! 

On Sketchbooks

victoriaying:

I got into a conversation with someone on Twitter about Sketchbooks and how to work in them. 


image

Personally I’ve got a long and fraught history with Sketchbooks and like many difficult relationships in my life, it took years to finally get to a place where the Sketchbook and I could be friends who fight fair and make each other better. 


image

When I was a kid in High school, I had a ton of sketchbooks. I had no fear and just filled my cheap spiral bound whatever purchased from Wal Mart full of drawings. I was proud of almost all of them (blessed that naive ninny) and never had a problem filling them to the brim. 


image

As I got older and started engaging online with artists communities, I found myself pushing to create better work and this caused me to start realizing that a lot of my sketchbook drawings were (gasp) actually quite terrible. I started getting self conscious when I was around other artists or when I was sharing my work online. 


image

I remember the first time we had a meet up of our artist community at San Diego Comic Con. It was amazing to meet all these great artists who I had gotten to know online in person! (I also met my future husband here, but we only said hello and didn’t actually ‘meet’ until two years later) But I was so nervous about my sketchbook. These events were all about passing around your sketchbook to show other people and to have them do a drawing for you in yours, so it was very nerve wracking to see these professional full time artists looking at my high school sketchbook. That book was very thin because I just kept tearing pages out of it. This was bad because not only was the book thin, it was also obvious that I was a very self conscious artist. 

After this I actually abandoned sketchbooks entirely. I chose to draw only on copy paper so there was less pressure. I would walk around with the pages on a clip pad so that if one was bad I could just toss it and nobody would be the wiser. 

I would start sketchbooks, but would never get further than halfway through before I abandoned them. I would go through a lull of not drawing and then the drawings would just show a skill level so far away from where I was I had to just get rid of them from the shame. 

It also didn’t help that I had a weird hoarding tendency with sketchbooks. I used to travel a lot with my family and would bring back blank books from all over the world. I had some from Nepal, Japan, Germany, and all of them were beautiful and perfect. 

I was too afraid to touch them. I knew that the drawings wouldn’t all be good and I couldn’t ruin this one book that I had. This led to me having a whole shelf in my house of blank un used sketchbooks. 

It wasn’t until we did our first Kickstarter, with Curiosities, that I sort of got over that way of thinking. I started to realize that this project that we were working towards could be good, could be bad, but we had to finish it. If it wasn’t perfect, that was okay, we were learning and we would do better next time. With our next project we could always show improvement and have people remember the good drawings/paintings rather than the less than stellar ones. 

This philosophy got us to finish a project that I couldn’t have imagined that we would have done if I had still been that insecure high schooler tearing out pages from the sketchbook. It’s incredibly important to move on and just keep moving forward even if those mistakes are embarrassing. 

After this, I started to think about my sketchbook in the same way. If I did a bad drawing, I just had to do a better one next. People don’t tend to remember failures only successes, so even though my book isn’t totally full of great drawings, people walk away only remember the decent ones. If I had torn out a bunch of pages in the book, I don’t think that I would have been able to finish any of them.

The year to date, I’ve finished two sketchbooks. A huge acheivmenet for myself. I feel like I finally broke through a wall that had been haunting me since high school and now I’m able to move more quickly learn from my mistakes and get better fast. 

Even Hayo Miyazaki, the legendary film maker, feels the same way about his films Acorrding to his new book “Turning Point” Miyazaki says: 


"Making films is all about—as soon as you’re finished—continually regretting what you’ve done. When we look at films we’ve made, all we can see are the flaws; we can’t even watch them in a normal way. I never feel like watching my own films again. So unless I start working on a new one, I’ll never be free from the curse of the last one. I’m serious. Unless I start working on the next film, the last one will be a drag on me for another two or three years."  — Hayo Miyazaki

And that’s the way we should feel about our sketchbooks, we know that there are flaws but we have to keep moving, share it with the world and make the next one better. 

ca-tsuka:

Infinite battle by Stephen Vyas.
high resolution →

ca-tsuka:

Infinite battle by Stephen Vyas.

jigokuen:

Fanart Thursday! Top is inspired by the Batgirl redesign helmed by Cameron Stewart, Babs Tarr, and Brenden Fletcher. Bottom is a ninja turtles piece for Nucleus this weekend, prints are available through them. 

Thanks for looking! 

shaburdies:

halfglovepunch:

Sailor Moon: Modern Guardians

With the 20th anniversary of Sailor Moon happening, I decided to redesign the five main Sailor Scouts and give their outfits/uniforms and tailor them to fit each character a little more/be less dated. I replaced their tiaras for high-tech visors that vary slightly for each scout.  

Originally, I was going to wait to post these rough pieces once I finished the actual piece for an upcoming Sailor Moon art show I was doing but my twin brother wscottforbes wanted to post his version of it (I’ll link his once it goes up), so here are mine! A rather weird style for me to draw in… I drew most of these a few months ago. Expect a better piece to be posted later in the month/August.

FINALLY!! i’ve been anticipating this for so long now ;_; love ben’s redesigns!